Category: News

Process and Projects

With the end goal of ecological survey, a great venture portrayal ought to contain the accompanying:

An unmistakable and nitty gritty composed portrayal (counting all segments) of the whole extent of work. This ought to likewise include:

Every other option (extends) that have been considered as answers for the circumstance.

Any extra work-financed by different sources-to be performed considerably a similar time.

Studies, plans illustrations, portrayals and schematics that can be utilized to comprehend the whole task.

Photographs, illustrations and maps demonstrating the proposed zone and site with regards to its environment.

On the off chance that the task is a building(s) procurement, date of development.

The area courthouse is a noteworthy building that is situated in the most established town in the state. In the course of recent years a few “confined” surges have happened in the two-square locale encompassing the courthouse. These surges create because of precipitation occasions that are at or close to the yearly most extreme. The floodwaters have streamed both into the memorable courthouse (photographs were given) and the abutting attach, flanking the parking garage toward the east of the courthouse. The surges begin in the region of the parking garage and stream south and west into the courthouse complex, getting onto the declining boulevards contiguous the courthouse (photographs were given).

The rehashed flooding occasions are in part caused by a strangely high water table in this little zone. The water table has hit the ground surface in a few areas to create manufactured springs. At the point when rain happens there is practically no penetration and for all intents and purposes the greater part of the water streams downhill at first glance as overland stream. Along these lines a typical precipitation occasion can prompt water profundities on the ground that would be more prominent than those related with a twenty-year surge.

NO TIME FOR HUMANITARIAN PARALYSIS

19 January 2017, Amman: The overwhelming scale, complexity and duration of the Syrian humanitarian catastrophe must not be allowed to frustrate efforts to reach everyone with the relief they need to survive and live with dignity. Nor is there any time to lose in strengthening the longer-term resilience of refugees and preparing for the hard tasks ahead in Syria, warns aid agency CARE ahead of an international meeting on the Syria crisis in Helsinki, Finland, Tuesday.

With indiscriminate attacks against civilians continuing and millions of people still trapped in hard-to-reach areas without the basic necessities for survival, CARE is concerned by a risk of international fatigue and feeling of hopelessness.

“It is all too easy to feel helpless and overwhelmed by the scale of the disaster, but no one has the right to give up on behalf of Syrians fighting for survival. No victim of this war should want for relief due to a lack of will or funding from the international community,” stresses Richard Hamilton, CARE’s Regional Syria Response Director.

CARE urges donors and leaders meeting in Helsinki to ensure the implementation of commitments made at the London Conference last year. At the “Supporting Syria and the Region” Conference in London, the international community agreed on a “comprehensive new approach” to address the protracted crisis. Donors committed to significant financial pledges and policy changes to improve the lives of refugees and host communities.

The promises made in London have the potential to make a significant contribution to improving the lives of both refugee and vulnerable host communities in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey: the three countries hosting approximately 75 percent of refugees from Syria.

However, as a new report “Stand and Deliver”, signed by CARE and 27 other NGOs concludes, the conference failed to deliver with regard to the core issues of the protection of civilians inside Syria and of refugees in neighboring countries. Moreover the humanitarian needs continue to rise without a commensurate increase in international support for Syria’s neighbors, including by sharing the responsibility for hosting refugees more equitably.

“Fully implementing the ‘new approach’ of the London Conference requires sustained political will, as well as sufficient funding. Now is the time for governments to fulfil the commitments made at the 2016 Conference, and place the rights of refugees and the communities that host them at the forefront of the international agenda,” says Hamilton.

More specifically, CARE recommends the following:

Ensure refugees from Syria have the right to legal stay, education and inclusive access to decent work and economic opportunities

  • Host countries, with the support of donors, should introduce the necessary domestic policy changes that guarantee the right to legal stay, quality education and livelihoods to refugees, thus ensuring the realisation of the commitments made in London.
  • All countries must strengthen refugee women’s, men’s, girls’ and boys’ access to protection by setting up clear, accessible and affordable procedures to obtain and maintain valid documentation, residency and registration. Legal protection is a prerequisite to improving access to livelihoods, education and other basic services. These legal protections should be equally extended to Palestine refugees from Syria.
  • All countries must remove barriers preventing men and women refugees from accessing decent work opportunities by addressing exploitation in the workplace, removing restrictions on legal stay and freedom of movement, scale-up efforts to support the development of micro, small and medium sized Syrian-owned enterprises, and expanding initiatives to create jobs for both refugees and host communities.
  • Donors and host countries should avoid creating a lost generation by ensuring that every last girl and boy benefits from quality education by continuing to open new places in public schools, placing more emphasis on ensuring retention and learning outcomes, addressing the worst forms of child labour, and providing sufficient opportunities for certified non-formal education with civil society support.

Share responsibility

  • Donors should follow through on multi-year aid funding at the same level as 2016 and as foreseen in the commitments made at London.
  • Donors must continue to extend and expand bilateral and multilateral support to Syria’s neighbouring countries to ensure necessary policy changes are introduced.

Wealthy countries must increase resettlement to at least 10 percent of the Syrian refugee population by the end of 2017, in addition to scaling up safe and regular routes through other forms of admission, including family reunification, scholarships and labour-based schemes.

Provide asylum

  • All countries must allow entry to asylum seekers fleeing violence and seeking international protection, and ensure that full individual case assessments are afforded for any and all cases, as a minimum where there is risk of deportation. This includes countries neighbouring Syria, in Europe and beyond.

No Time for Humanitarian Paralysis

Amman: The overwhelming scale, complexity and duration of the Syrian humanitarian catastrophe must not be allowed to frustrate efforts to reach everyone with the relief they need to survive and live with dignity. Nor is there any time to lose in strengthening the longer-term resilience of refugees and preparing for the hard tasks ahead in Syria, warns aid agency CARE ahead of an international meeting on the Syria crisis in Helsinki, Finland, Tuesday.

With indiscriminate attacks against civilians continuing and millions of people still trapped in hard-to-reach areas without the basic necessities for survival, CARE is concerned by a risk of international fatigue and feeling of hopelessness.

“It is all too easy to feel helpless and overwhelmed by the scale of the disaster, but no one has the right to give up on behalf of Syrians fighting for survival. No victim of this war should want for relief due to a lack of will or funding from the international community,” stresses Richard Hamilton, CARE’s Regional Syria Response Director.

CARE urges donors and leaders meeting in Helsinki to ensure the implementation of commitments made at the London Conference last year. At the “Supporting Syria and the Region” Conference in London, the international community agreed on a “comprehensive new approach” to address the protracted crisis. Donors committed to significant financial pledges and policy changes to improve the lives of refugees and host communities.

The promises made in London have the potential to make a significant contribution to improving the lives of both refugee and vulnerable host communities in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey: the three countries hosting approximately 75 percent of refugees from Syria.

However, as a new report “Stand and Deliver”, signed by CARE and 27 other NGOs concludes, the conference failed to deliver with regard to the core issues of the protection of civilians inside Syria and of refugees in neighboring countries. Moreover the humanitarian needs continue to rise without a commensurate increase in international support for Syria’s neighbors, including by sharing the responsibility for hosting refugees more equitably.

“Fully implementing the ‘new approach’ of the London Conference requires sustained political will, as well as sufficient funding. Now is the time for governments to fulfil the commitments made at the 2016 Conference, and place the rights of refugees and the communities that host them at the forefront of the international agenda,” says Hamilton.

More specifically, CARE recommends the following:

Ensure refugees from Syria have the right to legal stay, education and inclusive access to decent work and economic opportunities

Host countries, with the support of donors, should introduce the necessary domestic policy changes that guarantee the right to legal stay, quality education and livelihoods to refugees, thus ensuring the realisation of the commitments made in London.
All countries must strengthen refugee women’s, men’s, girls’ and boys’ access to protection by setting up clear, accessible and affordable procedures to obtain and maintain valid documentation, residency and registration. Legal protection is a prerequisite to improving access to livelihoods, education and other basic services. These legal protections should be equally extended to Palestine refugees from Syria.
All countries must remove barriers preventing men and women refugees from accessing decent work opportunities by addressing exploitation in the workplace, removing restrictions on legal stay and freedom of movement, scale-up efforts to support the development of micro, small and medium sized Syrian-owned enterprises, and expanding initiatives to create jobs for both refugees and host communities.
Donors and host countries should avoid creating a lost generation by ensuring that every last girl and boy benefits from quality education by continuing to open new places in public schools, placing more emphasis on ensuring retention and learning outcomes, addressing the worst forms of child labour, and providing sufficient opportunities for certified non-formal education with civil society support.
Share responsibility

Donors should follow through on multi-year aid funding at the same level as 2016 and as foreseen in the commitments made at London.
Donors must continue to extend and expand bilateral and multilateral support to Syria’s neighbouring countries to ensure necessary policy changes are introduced.
Wealthy countries must increase resettlement to at least 10 percent of the Syrian refugee population by the end of 2017, in addition to scaling up safe and regular routes through other forms of admission, including family reunification, scholarships and labour-based schemes.

Provide asylum

All countries must allow entry to asylum seekers fleeing violence and seeking international protection, and ensure that full individual case assessments are afforded for any and all cases, as a minimum where there is risk of deportation. This includes countries neighbouring Syria, in Europe and beyond.

NEW REPORT: 10 MOST UNDER-REPORTED HUMANITARIAN CRISES OF 2016

Geneva, January 17, 2017. The international aid organization CARE International has published a new report today highlighting ten humanitarian crises that have received the least media attention in 2016. The report “Suffering in silence: The 10 most under-reported humanitarian crises of 2016” features the food crises in Eritrea, Madagascar, North Korea, Papua New Guinea; the conflicts in Burundi, Lake Chad Basin, Democratic Republic of Congo, Central African Republic, Sudan and last year’s monsoon floods in Bangladesh.

“There are many disasters around the world that rarely make it into the news. With this report CARE aims to shine the spotlight on those humanitarian crises that have been neglected or eclipsed by others grabbing the world’s attention”, says Philippe Guiton, CARE International’s Humanitarian and Operations Director.

Media attention and fundraising for humanitarian causes are closely intertwined. Watching people suffering on TV prompts many people to engage and donate, which is widely known as ‘the CNN effect’. “The media has the power to set agendas, hold politicians accountable and help raise crucial funds to deliver aid”, says Guiton. “At the same time, politicians must not act solely based on political interests. Politicians prefer to focus their attention on the most visible emergencies to show their constituencies that they are acting. These humanitarian crises are not simply forgotten. They are wilfully ignored and neglected by world leaders.”

In 2017, the world faces conflicts that are raging longer and longer. Poor families have to cope with typhoons, droughts and floods that are becoming stronger and happen more frequently. The UN’s Global Humanitarian Overview for 2017 requires $22.2 billion to help over 92 million people in urgent need. “Poor people must become more resilient to protect their lives, homes and livelihoods from recurring natural disasters. World leaders must assume their responsibility to prevent and end conflict. Ultimately, they hold the power to find political solutions to end bloodshed and suffering. They must step up their action”, Guiton urges.

CARE International researched over 30 natural disasters and ongoing conflicts that affected at least one million people and analysed how often they were mentioned in online news articles. “Most of these crises will continue to need our support beyond 2017. Every day, families across the world live in constant fear for their survival as bombs are dropping in their neighbourhood, as floods or drought destroy their fields and kill their cattle, as brutal attacks force them to leave their homes. They deserve their stories being told”, says Guiton.

You can download the report here.

Note to editors: Using the media monitoring services of Meltwater Group, CARE analysed those natural disasters or conflicts that received the least media attention in 2016. More than 250,000 global online sources were monitored in English, French and German. To filter according to scale, we chose countries in which at least one million people are affected by natural or man-made disasters. The result is a list of over 30 crises that we analysed and ranked by the number of articles mentioning each, starting with the one that received the fewest articles.

Media contacts:

Clare Spurrell, Head of Global Communications, CARE International, Email: Spurrell@careinternational.org, Mobile: +41 79 379 8952

Sandra Bulling, Media and Communications Coordinator, CARE International, Email: bulling@careinternational.org, Mobile: +49 157 5360 5481

About CARE

CARE International works around the globe to save lives, defeat poverty and achieve social justice. We put women and girls in the centre because we know that we cannot overcome poverty until all people have equal rights and opportunities.

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY: 33 UNSUNG SHEROES TO BE AWARDED NARI SHAKTI PURASKAAR

Calling them ‘unsung sheroes’, the Union women and child development (WCD) ministry has shortlisted 33 women, who will be awarded Nari Shakti Puraskaar on the occasion of International Women’s day by President Pranab Mukherjee.

Among the awardees is the state of Rajasthan for its ‘Beti Bachao Beti Padhao’ campaign that took its sex ratio from 929 in December 2016 to 942 through a statewide awareness campaign. The ‘Annaprashan’ and ‘Goad Bharai’ programmes organised regularly for pregnant women at anganwadi centres in all districts of Rajasthan also helped it make the cut.

The ministry will also award three women scientists – Subha Varier, B Codanayaguy and Anatta Sonney – who have contributed to the launch of 104 satellites by ISRO on February 15.

Varier contributed in finalising the configuration of Satish Dhawan Space Centre and SHAR, Shriharikota range, for real time display. Codanayaguy from Puducherry has been with ISRO for over 30 years now and was responsible for the control system of all the solid motors of the PSLV C37 launch vehicle. Annata has helped ISRO design and develop orbit determination systems.

THE AWARDEES

Asia’s first woman to drive a diesel train at the age of 20 – Mumtaz Kazi – will also receive the award. “I draw my inspiration from my father and had an inclination to drive a train since I was young. I had applied for this job back in 1988 and joined Indian Railways in 1991,” 46-year-old Kazi told Mail Today.

Motorcyclist Pallavi Fauzdar, who has mobilised her passion to raise awareness about malnutrition in children and female foeticide, will also be honoured. Fauzdar has conquered eight mountain passes above 5,000 metres altitude in a single trip, covering 3,500 kms of rough terrain in Himachal, Leh, Ladakh and Kashmir.

Anoyara Khatun of West Bengal, who has saved 50 minors from child marriage and 85 girls from getting trafficked, also caught the eye of the WCD ministry. Khatun will also be awarded for helping 200 girls pursue education.

India’s first female graphic novelist, Amruta Patil, will also be awarded for her work in memento mori, sexuality, myth and sustainable living through graphics.

FOCUS ON WOMEN FROM MARGINALISED SECTIONS

Speaking to Mail Today, WCD minister Maneka Gandhi said, “We are always trying to highlight the work of women, who are relentlessly contributing to society in the most unusual ways and deserve to be highlighted.”‘

“This time, the ministry is giving these awards to women, mostly belonging to the marginalised and vulnerable sections, who are working for the society at many levels,” a senior WCD ministry official said.

ALLOCATIONS FOR WOMEN BY DIFFERENT MINISTRIES/DEPARTMENTS HAS INCREASED FROM RS. 14,378.68 CRORES IN 2005-06 TO RS. 90,624.76 CRORES IN 2016-17 UNDER GENDER BUDGETING

In order to mainstream gender across sectors and all levels of governance, Government of India, has adopted Gender Budgeting as a tool in 2004-05. Ministry of Women and Child Development has been consistently promoting gender budgeting across the country as a pathway to ensure gender mainstreaming at all levels and stages of the budgetary process. Gender Budget Statement was introduced as a part of the Union Budget in 2005-06. To facilitate integration of gender analysis in policies, programmes and schemes, the Ministry of Finance in consultation with the Ministry of Women and Child Development had issued a Gender Budget Charter on 8th March, 2007 outlining the composition and functions of the Gender Budgeting Cells (GBCs). The most important milestone in this regard has been the institutionalization of the progress through formation of GBCs in various Ministries and Departments.  As of now, 57 Central Ministries /Departments have set up GBCs. Another important progress made in the Gender Budgeting system is inclusion of a column on gender impact in the Expenditure Finance Committee (EFC) document with effect from 1st April, 2014 for inclusion of women’s concerns at the planning stage and inclusion of a gender perspective in the Outcome Budget Process. The magnitude of Gender Budget as reflected in the GB Statement shows allocations made for women by different Ministries/Departments has increased from Rs. 14,378.68 crores in 2005-06 to Rs. 90,624.76 crores in 2016-17.

Funds are released to Central/ State Govt./Autonomous institutions for carrying out the training programmes for enhancing gender sensitivity and gender expertise, training of the Gender Budgeting Cells for mainstreaming gender concerns across levels of governance. Government autonomous institutions both at the national level and state level have been supported by the Ministry to develop in-house GB expertise and have started imparting training to various other stakeholders.  To support the training programmes in a structured and sustained way the Ministry is in the process of designating nodal centres at the state level. 20 states have already designated their nodal centre and at the Central level, National Institute of Financial Management Faridabad has been designated as the nodal centre by the Ministry for undertaking gender budgeting activities.

This information was given by Minister of State for Women & Child Development, Smt Krishna Raj in reply to a question in Rajya Sabha today.

WOMEN AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT MINISTRY TO FORM ALLIANCE AGAINST ONLINE CHILD ABUSE

A National Alliance against online child sexual abuse and exploitation is being formed by the ministry of of women and child development. The ministry held a consultation yesterday to ensure better implemnetation of legal frameworks, policies, national strategies.

The consultation sought to bring a common definition of child pornography including amendment of acts including the Information technology Act and the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act.

Other objectives of the consultations included:

– Set up a multi-member secretariat based in the ministry of women and child development with a portal which includes a hotline for reporting.
– Provide a platform for Government and NGOs and other child rights activists for networking and information sharing.
– Inform and educate member organisations, parents, teachers, front line service providers and children on the rights of the children and various issues related to online child abuse and exploitation.
– Document and showcases success stories and best practices in terms of prevention of online abuse and exploitation of children.

The home ministry, ministry of electronics and information technology, department of school education and literacy, National Commission for Protection of Child Rights and civil society organisations participated.

“Online child abuse and exploitation amplifies existing forms of offline bullying, stalking and harassment. It also facilitates the sexual exploitation of children through the production and dissemination of child sexual abuse materials and by facilitating the sexual exploitation and trafficking of children,” the ministry’s press statement said.

Note that in May 2016, a portal named Cyber Crime Prevention against Women and Children (CCPWC) under the Nirbhaya Fund, was being developed jointly by the Home and Women & Child Development Ministry to let Indian women post complaints about online harassment.

At the same time, a draft of National Policy for Women was released by Union minister, Maneka Gandhi, which sought to address emerging challenges confronting women, including protection against cyber crime, security to surrogate mothers and bringing gender sensitivity in family planning policies.

WOMEN IN INDIA WILL NOW GET 26 WEEKS OF MATERNITY LEAVE INSTEAD OF JUST 12

The Lok Sabha approved an amendment Bill that makes it mandatory for companies with more than 50 employees to provide a daycare centre nearby.

Women in India will now be allowed maternity leave of 26 weeks, as per a new amendment to a legislation. The Maternity Benefit Amendment Bill, 2016, which was approved by the Lok Sabha on Thursday, extends the duration by more than twice the earlier figure of just 12 weeks.

It is a “historic day for women”, the Ministry of Women and Child Development said, adding that the Bill will “pave the way for a healthy and secure mother and a well-nourished child”. Women and Child Development Minister Maneka Gandhi called it a “momentous step” and thanked her colleagues for supporting the Bill.

According to the amendment, commissioning mothers, who have a child through surrogacy, and women who adopt a child below the age of three months will be allowed leave of 12 weeks. The period of maternity leave will be calculated from the date the child is handed over to the commissioning or adoptive mother.

The Bill also makes it mandatory for companies with more than 50 employees to provide a crèche facility within a prescribed distance. Mothers will be allowed four visits daily to the day care centre.

NEW REPORT: 10 MOST UNDER-REPORTED HUMANITARIAN CRISES OF 2016

The international aid organization CARE International has published a new report today highlighting ten humanitarian crises that have received the least media attention in 2016. The report “Suffering in silence: The 10 most under-reported humanitarian crises of 2016” features the food crises in Eritrea, Madagascar, North Korea, Papua New Guinea; the conflicts in Burundi, Lake Chad Basin, Democratic Republic of Congo, Central African Republic, Sudan and last year’s monsoon floods in Bangladesh.

“There are many disasters around the world that rarely make it into the news. With this report CARE aims to shine the spotlight on those humanitarian crises that have been neglected or eclipsed by others grabbing the world’s attention”, says Philippe Guiton, CARE International’s Humanitarian and Operations Director.

Media attention and fundraising for humanitarian causes are closely intertwined. Watching people suffering on TV prompts many people to engage and donate, which is widely known as ‘the CNN effect’. “The media has the power to set agendas, hold politicians accountable and help raise crucial funds to deliver aid”, says Guiton. “At the same time, politicians must not act solely based on political interests. Politicians prefer to focus their attention on the most visible emergencies to show their constituencies that they are acting. These humanitarian crises are not simply forgotten. They are wilfully ignored and neglected by world leaders.”

In 2017, the world faces conflicts that are raging longer and longer. Poor families have to cope with typhoons, droughts and floods that are becoming stronger and happen more frequently. The UN’s Global Humanitarian Overview for 2017 requires $22.2 billion to help over 92 million people in urgent need. “Poor people must become more resilient to protect their lives, homes and livelihoods from recurring natural disasters. World leaders must assume their responsibility to prevent and end conflict. Ultimately, they hold the power to find political solutions to end bloodshed and suffering. They must step up their action”, Guiton urges.

CARE International researched over 30 natural disasters and ongoing conflicts that affected at least one million people and analysed how often they were mentioned in online news articles. “Most of these crises will continue to need our support beyond 2017. Every day, families across the world live in constant fear for their survival as bombs are dropping in their neighbourhood, as floods or drought destroy their fields and kill their cattle, as brutal attacks force them to leave their homes. They deserve their stories being told”, says Guiton.

WOMEN IN INDIA WILL NOW GET 26 WEEKS OF MATERNITY LEAVE INSTEAD OF JUST 12

The Lok Sabha approved an amendment Bill that makes it mandatory for companies with more than 50 employees to provide a daycare centre nearby.

Women in India will now be allowed maternity leave of 26 weeks, as per a new amendment to a legislation. The Maternity Benefit Amendment Bill, 2016, which was approved by the Lok Sabha on Thursday, extends the duration by more than twice the earlier figure of just 12 weeks.

It is a “historic day for women”, the Ministry of Women and Child Development said, adding that the Bill will “pave the way for a healthy and secure mother and a well-nourished child”. Women and Child Development Minister Maneka Gandhi called it a “momentous step” and thanked her colleagues for supporting the Bill.

According to the amendment, commissioning mothers, who have a child through surrogacy, and women who adopt a child below the age of three months will be allowed leave of 12 weeks. The period of maternity leave will be calculated from the date the child is handed over to the commissioning or adoptive mother.

The Bill also makes it mandatory for companies with more than 50 employees to provide a crèche facility within a prescribed distance. Mothers will be allowed four visits daily to the day care centre.